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'Happy Days' stars share condolences after Erin Moran's death

Ron Howard, Henry Winkler and other stars from the cast of "Happy Days" are sharing their condolences in the wake of Erin Moran's Death.

Moran portrayed Joanie Cunningham, Howard's sister on the show. She was found dead Saturday night.

>> Read more trending news

“Such sad sad news. RIP Erin. I’ll always choose to remember you on our show making scenes better, getting laughs and lighting up tv screens,” Howard wrote.

Henry Winkler, who as Arthur Fonzarelli or “The Fonz,” lived above the garage at the Cunningham's house on the long-running show said Moran's death came too soon.

>>Read ‘Happy Days’ actress Erin Moran dead at 56

“OH Erin … now you will finally have the peace you wanted so badly here on earth,” Winkler wrote. “Rest in it serenely now… too soon.”

Don Most, Ralph Malph, also shared his thoughts on Moran's death.

“So incredibly sad to hear about Erin. A wonderful, sweet, caring, talented woman," Most wrote. "I can’t really comprehend this right now. Very painful loss."

Hillary Clinton makes surprise appearance at Tribeca Fest

The premiere of a virtual reality short by Oscar-winning director Kathryn Bigelow was already a high-profile event at the Tribeca Film Festival on Saturday night. And then Hillary Clinton walked onstage.

Clinton was an unannounced panelist, there to discuss the scourge of elephant poaching — the subject of Bigelow's eight-minute film "The Protectors: Walk in the Rangers' Shoes," about park rangers trying to save elephants in Garamba National Park in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

She spoke about her work to save elephants from poachers slaughtering them for their ivory tusks, both as secretary of state in the Obama administration, and later with her family foundation, the Clinton Global Initiative.

"We've got to bust this market so it can't come back," she said of the illegal ivory market.

Before Clinton and the three other panelists were interviewed by Bigelow, the audience donned virtual reality headsets at their seats and experienced — in 360 degrees — what it's like to be one of the 200 rangers fighting well-armed poachers in the park the size of Delaware. The film gives the viewer both the experience of being in the grass and searching for poachers, and up in the air looking down. A wrenching scene shows the rangers arriving at the carcass of a slaughtered elephant.

"I realized that there was an intersection between poaching and terrorism, which led me to this project," Bigelow said. The director of "The Hurt Locker" and "Zero Dark Thirty" directed the short along with Imraan Ismail, a virtual-reality veteran, who also was on Saturday's panel. "They're outmanned and outgunned and they're putting themselves in the line of fire," Ismail said of the rangers.

Clinton told the audience that she first became focused on what she called "the horrific slaughter of elephants" when she was secretary of state.

"It became clear to everyone that this was not just a terrible crisis when it came to the elephant population, it was a trade, a trafficking that was funding a lot of bad folks, a lot of bad actors," she said. "It was being used to take ivory and sell it in order to buy more weapons, and support the kind of terroristic activity that these and other groups were engaged in."

Clinton noted that while China was the biggest market for illegal ivory, the United States was the second-biggest. "So China is going to be a key player but we are, too," she said.

The former Democratic presidential candidate noted that Saturday was Earth Day, "and we are marching on behalf of science," referring to marches throughout the U.S. on Saturday.

"And part of science is understanding the intricate relationships that we share with all those on this planet and particularly large mammals like elephants, who have a role to play both in reality and in our imaginations," she said.

Clinton told Bigelow that her virtual reality film was "so critical, because it is a portal — a portal that people can go into and think about, 'Here we are in New York, what can I do?' And there is a lot that can be done — stop the killing, stop the trafficking, and stop the demand. And part of that is protecting these rangers, who are up against some of the most ruthless killers anywhere on the planet right now, and doing the very best they can."

The Tribeca appearance was one of a series Clinton has made lately in New York, including turning up at several Broadway shows, speaking at a recent women's conference, and accepting an award this week from an LGBT community group. Audiences have greeted her with loud cheers and ovations, as they did on Saturday night.

National Geographic will release Bigelow's short on May 1 on the virtual reality app Within, and on YouTube and Facebook360 the following week. The film is a co-production of the virtual reality company Here Be Dragons and the film production company Annapurna Pictures.

Hillary Clinton makes surprise appearance at Tribeca Fest

The premiere of a virtual reality short by Oscar-winning director Kathryn Bigelow was already a high-profile event at the Tribeca Film Festival on Saturday night. And then Hillary Clinton walked onstage.

Clinton was an unannounced panelist, there to discuss the scourge of elephant poaching — the subject of Bigelow's eight-minute film "The Protectors: Walk in the Rangers' Shoes," about park rangers trying to save elephants in Garamba National Park in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

She spoke about her work to save elephants from poachers slaughtering them for their ivory tusks, both as secretary of state in the Obama administration, and later with her family foundation, the Clinton Global Initiative.

"We've got to bust this market so it can't come back," she said of the illegal ivory market.

Before Clinton and the three other panelists were interviewed by Bigelow, the audience donned virtual reality headsets at their seats and experienced — in 360 degrees — what it's like to be one of the 200 rangers fighting well-armed poachers in the park the size of Delaware. The film gives the viewer both the experience of being in the grass and searching for poachers, and up in the air looking down. A wrenching scene shows the rangers arriving at the carcass of a slaughtered elephant.

"I realized that there was an intersection between poaching and terrorism, which led me to this project," Bigelow said. The director of "The Hurt Locker" and "Zero Dark Thirty" directed the short along with Imraan Ismail, a virtual-reality veteran, who also was on Saturday's panel. "They're outmanned and outgunned and they're putting themselves in the line of fire," Ismail said of the rangers.

Clinton told the audience that she first became focused on what she called "the horrific slaughter of elephants" when she was secretary of state.

"It became clear to everyone that this was not just a terrible crisis when it came to the elephant population, it was a trade, a trafficking that was funding a lot of bad folks, a lot of bad actors," she said. "It was being used to take ivory and sell it in order to buy more weapons, and support the kind of terroristic activity that these and other groups were engaged in."

Clinton noted that while China was the biggest market for illegal ivory, the United States was the second-biggest. "So China is going to be a key player but we are, too," she said.

The former Democratic presidential candidate noted that Saturday was Earth Day, "and we are marching on behalf of science," referring to marches throughout the U.S. on Saturday.

"And part of science is understanding the intricate relationships that we share with all those on this planet and particularly large mammals like elephants, who have a role to play both in reality and in our imaginations," she said.

Clinton told Bigelow that her virtual reality film was "so critical, because it is a portal — a portal that people can go into and think about, 'Here we are in New York, what can I do?' And there is a lot that can be done — stop the killing, stop the trafficking, and stop the demand. And part of that is protecting these rangers, who are up against some of the most ruthless killers anywhere on the planet right now, and doing the very best they can."

The Tribeca appearance was one of a series Clinton has made lately in New York, including turning up at several Broadway shows, speaking at a recent women's conference, and accepting an award this week from an LGBT community group. Audiences have greeted her with loud cheers and ovations, as they did on Saturday night.

National Geographic will release Bigelow's short on May 1 on the virtual reality app Within, and on YouTube and Facebook360 the following week. The film is a co-production of the virtual reality company Here Be Dragons and the film production company Annapurna Pictures.

Erin Moran, Joanie Cunningham in "Happy Days," dies at 56

Erin Moran, the former child star who played Joanie Cunningham in the sitcoms "Happy Days" and "Joanie Loves Chachi," died Saturday at age 56.

A statement from the sheriff's department in Harrison County, Indiana, said the dispatcher "received a 911 call about an unresponsive female. Upon arrival of first responders, it was determined that Erin Moran Fleischmann was deceased. An autopsy is pending."

The dispatcher confirmed to The Associated Press that the woman was the actress, who had been married to Steven Fleischmann.

"Such sad sad news. RIP Erin," ''Happy Days" star Ron Howard tweeted Saturday. "I'll always choose to remember you on our show making scenes better, getting laughs and lighting up TV screens."

A Burbank, California, native, Moran began acting in TV and movies before she was 10 years old. She had several years of experience when she was cast in 1974 in "Happy Days" as Joanie Cunningham, the kid sister to high school student Richie Cunningham, played by Howard. Other cast members included Tom Bosley and Marion Ross as Joanie's parents and Henry Winkler as the loveable tough guy Arthur "The Fonz" Fonzarelli.

"What happened with all of us was like we were this family," she told Xfinity in 2009. "It was so surreal with all the cast members. ... They were my family, get it?"

Debuting at a time of nostalgia for the seemingly innocent 1950s, the sitcom was set in Milwaukee and became a long-running hit. Howard and Winkler were the show's biggest stars, but the smiling, freckle-faced Moran also became popular. In 1982, she was paired off with fellow "Happy Days" performer Scott Baio in the short-lived "Joanie Loves Chachi." Moran returned to "Happy Days" in 1984, the show's final season.

"I would love to do a feature (film), I'd love to do a play," she told CNN in 1981 when asked what she'd like to do after "Happy Days."

Her more recent credits included "The Love Boat" and "Murder, She Wrote," but she never approached the success of "Happy Days" and was more often in the news for her numerous personal and financial struggles and was reportedly homeless at times.

In 2011, she and Ross and former "Happy Days" actors Anson Williams and Donnie Most sued CBS, saying they were owed money for merchandising related to the show. The lawsuit was settled the following year.

Moran told Xfinity that she had been working on a memoir, called "Happy Days, Depressing Nights."

"OH Erin... now you will finally have the peace you wanted so badly here on earth," Winkler tweeted Saturday. "Rest In It serenely now.. too soon."

Erin Moran, Joanie Cunningham in "Happy Days," dies at 56

Erin Moran, the former child star who played Joanie Cunningham in the sitcoms "Happy Days" and "Joanie Loves Chachi," died Saturday at age 56.

A statement from the sheriff's department in Harrison County, Indiana, said the dispatcher "received a 911 call about an unresponsive female. Upon arrival of first responders, it was determined that Erin Moran Fleischmann was deceased. An autopsy is pending."

The dispatcher confirmed to The Associated Press that the woman was the actress, who had been married to Steven Fleischmann.

"Such sad sad news. RIP Erin," ''Happy Days" star Ron Howard tweeted Saturday. "I'll always choose to remember you on our show making scenes better, getting laughs and lighting up TV screens."

A Burbank, California, native, Moran began acting in TV and movies before she was 10 years old. She had several years of experience when she was cast in 1974 in "Happy Days" as Joanie Cunningham, the kid sister to high school student Richie Cunningham, played by Howard. Other cast members included Tom Bosley and Marion Ross as Joanie's parents and Henry Winkler as the loveable tough guy Arthur "The Fonz" Fonzarelli.

"What happened with all of us was like we were this family," she told Xfinity in 2009. "It was so surreal with all the cast members. ... They were my family, get it?"

Debuting at a time of nostalgia for the seemingly innocent 1950s, the sitcom was set in Milwaukee and became a long-running hit. Howard and Winkler were the show's biggest stars, but the smiling, freckle-faced Moran also became popular. In 1982, she was paired off with fellow "Happy Days" performer Scott Baio in the short-lived "Joanie Loves Chachi." Moran returned to "Happy Days" in 1984, the show's final season.

"I would love to do a feature (film), I'd love to do a play," she told CNN in 1981 when asked what she'd like to do after "Happy Days."

Her more recent credits included "The Love Boat" and "Murder, She Wrote," but she never approached the success of "Happy Days" and was more often in the news for her numerous personal and financial struggles and was reportedly homeless at times.

In 2011, she and Ross and former "Happy Days" actors Anson Williams and Donnie Most sued CBS, saying they were owed money for merchandising related to the show. The lawsuit was settled the following year.

Moran told Xfinity that she had been working on a memoir, called "Happy Days, Depressing Nights."

"OH Erin... now you will finally have the peace you wanted so badly here on earth," Winkler tweeted Saturday. "Rest In It serenely now.. too soon."

'Happy Days' actress Erin Moran, 56, found dead in southern Indiana after authorities respond to 911 call

'Happy Days' actress Erin Moran, 56, found dead in southern Indiana after authorities respond to 911 call.

‘Happy Days’ actress Erin Moran dead at 56

Erin Moran, best known to TV audiences as Joanie Cunningham in “Happy Days” and its spinoff “Joanie Loves Chachi,” was found dead Saturday. She was 56.

Moran played the younger sister of Richie Cunningham for the show’s 11-season run. She reprised the role in the spinoff, which only lasted a season.

>> Read more trending news

After the show was canceled, she was cast in minor roles in “The Love Boat,” “Desperation Boulevard” and “Murder, She Wrote.” 

She appeared on “Celebrity Fit Club” in 2008, but Moran had hit hard times recently, reportedly drinking in parking lots and living in an Indiana trailer park before becoming homeless, according to The Huffington Post.

A cause of death has not been released.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Science May Not Be Political, But The March For Science Sure Was

Despite claims that the March for Science was nonpartisan, there was a lot of anger directed at President Trump.

2 groups arrested in Coachella cellphone thefts

Police have arrested five people in the theft of more than 40 cellphones, cash and credit cards at the Coachella music festival in the Southern California desert.

Indio police say multiple festival-goers reported the thefts, and investigators identified two separate groups of suspects who had multiple phones on them Saturday.

The Desert Sun reports (http://desert.sn/2poJYF2 ) that five people were booked into Riverside County jail on theft and conspiracy charges.

Police believe two women, 35-year-old Angela Trivino of New York City and 38-year-old Viviana Hernandez of Los Angeles, were working together. They identified the other group as 29-year-old Brenda Cansino of Miami, 27-year-old Marco Leon of Los Angeles and 25-year-old Sharon Ruiz of Van Nuys.

It's unclear whether they have attorneys.

One man was arrested at Coachella with more than 100 cellphones in his backpack on April 14.

___

Information from: The Desert Sun, http://www.desertsun.com

2 groups arrested in Coachella cellphone thefts

Police have arrested five people in the theft of more than 40 cellphones, cash and credit cards at the Coachella music festival in the Southern California desert.

Indio police say multiple festival-goers reported the thefts, and investigators identified two separate groups of suspects who had multiple phones on them Saturday.

The Desert Sun reports (http://desert.sn/2poJYF2 ) that five people were booked into Riverside County jail on theft and conspiracy charges.

Police believe two women, 35-year-old Angela Trivino of New York City and 38-year-old Viviana Hernandez of Los Angeles, were working together. They identified the other group as 29-year-old Brenda Cansino of Miami, 27-year-old Marco Leon of Los Angeles and 25-year-old Sharon Ruiz of Van Nuys.

It's unclear whether they have attorneys.

One man was arrested at Coachella with more than 100 cellphones in his backpack on April 14.

___

Information from: The Desert Sun, http://www.desertsun.com

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