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Texas man loses leg to flesh-eating bacteria after trip to the beach

 A Texas man has lost his right leg after contracting flesh-eating bacteria during a trip to the beach.

According to KRIV, Brian Parrott, 50, of Jacinto City started to feel sick after he went swimming with his family at a Galveston beach June 12. The following Wednesday, his right leg was red and covered in boils.

Doctors amputated the leg from the knee down at Houston's Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital, where Parrott remains in intensive care.

Parrott's mother, Donna Dailey, told KRIV that doctors believe the bacteria entered his system through a scratch on his foot. Parrott also suffers from diabetes, which takes a toll on the immune system, the Houston Chronicle reports.

Dailey said the family wants to share Parrott's story "to get the word out" about the bacteria.

"There's nothing more that we can do for my son, but maybe we can save somebody else," she told KRIV.According to the Chronicle, Parrott's family has started a GoFundMe campaign. 

Taco Bell offering free tacos on Tuesday

Taco Bell announced today it would offer one free Doritos Locos taco to customers on Tuesday afternoon, June 21, as part of the restaurant chain’s “Steal a Game, Steal a Taco” NBA promotion.

The special offer will run from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday only. Taco Bell had announced prior to the NBA Finals that it would give away Doritos Locos tacos if a team won on its opponent’s home court in the NBA Finals — and that ended up happening not once, but three times, with the Golden State Warriors winning Game 4 in Cleveland, then the Cavaliers winning Games 5 and 7 on Golden State’s home court.

No purchase is necessary, according to the promotion’s terms and conditions, and as always, the offer will be good at participating Taco Bell locations. There is, of course, a limit of one free taco per customer.

The 5 things you SHOULDN'T do this hurricane season

I'm sure there's plenty of things you'd rather be doing than getting ready for something that might never come, especially since it's been over a decade since any part of the Sunshine State has been hit by a hurricane.Just keep in mind that Mother Nature doesn't really care about those kinds of fun facts, and I suspect you won't either if you're hearing Action News Jax Chief Meteorologist Mike Buresh say a Category 5's about to land in our laps.If there's nothing else you take away from our hurricane special, remember these things that you SHOULDN'T do this hurricane season.5) PAY TOO MUCH ATTENTION TO THE YEARLY FORECASTThis is supposed to be an average year for hurricane activity, even though Hurricane Alex formed back in January and Tropical Storm Bonnie showed up last week.None of that really matters, according to Buresh, because it only takes one storm - no matter how strong - to cause serious issues for you.

"Our last 2 fatalities here in Northeastern Florida have occurred during tropical storms," Buresh noted.

Buresh also says that Florida having gone 11 years without a direct hurricane hit makes people complacent and not as apt to plan ahead.

"You forget about what you have to do or should do or be concerned about." Buresh added.4) FAIL TO PLAN AHEADDoctor Rick Knabb at the National Hurricane Center hit the road recently to get a sense of how Floridians get ready for hurricane season."Way too many people in the public are not as prepared as they need to be," Knabb said during a United States Senate subcommittee hearing last week.One of his biggest concerns is the estimated 3 million plus people living in Florida now who've never been through a hurricane. Knabb feels most of them have no idea what it takes to get ready.

Here's an easy way to plan for hurricane season.3) RELY ON CREDIT CARDS AFTER THE STORMThe odds are really good you won't have power if a big storm comes... and the bigger the storm, the more likely you'll be in the dark and stay in the dark.That's why having cash around is a great idea, according to Tasha Carter with the Florida Department of Financial Services."Sometimes with these storms, they create power outages that may restrict access to ATM's," Carter stated.For similar reasons, that's why you should fill the tank on any vehicles and shop for any food or supplies you'll need just before the storm comes. Don't just get the basics, either. Having some board games, a deck of cards or a good book can go a long way when the entire city goes dark.2) NOT KNOWING YOUR INSURANCE BEFORE THE STORMIt's not fun, that's for sure. No one wants to go blind reading the fine script in your car or home insurance policy.But there are worse fates in life. That might include you discovering that something you thought was covered by your insurance company isn't.Carter says make sure you know what your policy covers and if you need to make any changes, there could be a waiting period before those changes take effect, so do this right away.Click here to see a financial preparedness toolkit for helping you get that part of hurricane prep in order. There's also a Homeowners' Insurance Toolkit offered by Carter's office.1) STAY ALONE WHEN THE STORM COMESThere are obvious reasons why this is a bad idea, but there's also less obvious reasons.Imagine hearing the wind constantly blow like a freight train... or water flooding into your house... or a tree crashing on top of your roof. That's what happened to me and my family when we lived through Hurricane Andrew over 20 years ago. Take it from me... it's not the kind of thing you want to go through alone. I was only 12 when Andrew came, but I still remember that night like it was yesterday. Having my family around made it so much easier to bear. I have yet to meet a hurricane survivor who didn't feel that same way.

Trooper saves infant after woman rolls vehicle

An Ohio Highway Patrol trooper rushed to put out a fire after a woman rolled her vehicle during a pursuit, and after putting out the flames he discovered an infant hanging from a seat belt in a back seat.

“I opened up the door and there’s a 4-month infant hanging from the seat belt in the back seat in a car seat,” Trooper Sean Eitel told WBNS.

Eitel had been pursuing the vehicle after he said spotted the driver, Brandy Wilson, 35, driving erratically on Ohio 16 in Newark, a city about 30 miles east of Columbus.

Wilson pulled away from Eitel during the pursuit and sped up, eventually running a stop sign and striking a utility pole, Eitel said.

Wilson’s vehicle burst into flames and Eitel grabbed a fire extinguisher, not knowing that the baby was trapped inside.

“She started going towards the back of the car,” Eitel said, describing what Wilson was doing after the flames were extinguished. “An then I could hear her say ‘My baby!’”

The infant boy was rescued from the vehicle after Eitel cut the seat belt free. The child was left with family while the mother was taken into custody on a series of charges.

Wilson was charged with driving under suspension, reckless operation, failure to yield, failure to comply and two counts of child endangering.

Granola bars on recall list for possible listeria contamination

Quaker Oats is recalling its Quinoa Granola Bars because of possible listeria contamination.  

The Food and Drug Administration says one of Quaker's ingredient suppliers distributed sunflower kernels that may be tainted.  

So far, there have been no reports of any illnesses linked to the granola bars.  

While the vast majority of potentially affected Quaker products were withheld from ever reaching retail shelves, the products being recalled were distributed nationwide and are as follows:

  • 6.1 ounce boxes of Quaker Quinoa Granola Bars Chocolate Nut Medley with UPC code 30000 32241 and Best Before Dates of: 10/16/2016, 10/17/2016
  • 6.1 ounce boxes of Quaker Quinoa Granola Bars Yogurt, Fruit & Nut with UPC 30000 32243 and Best

Before Dates of: 10/10/2016, 10/11/2016

 

Genetically modified mosquitoes could join Zika virus fight

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., said Thursday he'd support the use of genetically modified mosquitoes in the Florida Keys to help stop the spread of the Zika virus.

"I think this is going to be such a crisis that we've got to move ahead with it, certainly the pilot study," Nelson told reporters during a stop at Tallahassee International Airport.

Florida has reported 102 documented cases — the most in the nation — of the mosquito-borne virus, which emerged last year in South Africa. The virus, while causing mild sickness, has been associated with severe birth defects.

Oxitec, a British company, wants to release about 3 million genetically modified mosquitoes in the Keys as part of the first-ever trial in the U.S. of such engineering. The genetic change is intended to produce offspring that die young and can't reproduce.

"It's not like taking a gene out of something and replacing it in the genetic makeup of something else," Nelson said. "This is altering a gene in the genetic makeup of the (Aedes) aegypti mosquito to turn off that mosquito's ability to reproduce. You have to meet a crisis head-on. And if this is what it takes to eliminate that strain of mosquito, then that is what we're going to have to do."

Nelson's comments came a day after Gov. Rick Scott announced he intends to travel to Washington next week to ask federal officials to quickly come to agreement on a plan to deal with the spread of the Zika virus.

Nelson on Thursday also continued pushing for $1.9 billion in emergency funding to help deal with Zika. The funding request, which was made by President Barack Obama, remains tied up in Congress.

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., said Thursday he'd support the use of genetically modified mosquitoes in the Florida Keys to help stop the spread of the Zika virus. "I think this is going to be such a crisis that we've got to move ahead with it, certainly the pilot study," Nelson told reporters during a stop at Tallahassee International Airport. Florida has reported 102 documented cases --- the most in the nation --- of the mosquito-borne virus, which emerged last year in South Africa. The virus, while causing mild sickness, has been associated with severe birth defects. Oxitec, a British company, wants to release about 3 million genetically modified mosquitoes in the Keys as part of the first-ever trial in the U.S. of such engineering. The genetic change is intended to produce offspring that die young and can't reproduce. "It's not like taking a gene out of something and replacing it in the genetic makeup of something else," Nelson said. "This is altering a gene in the genetic makeup of the (Aedes) aegypti mosquito to turn off that mosquito's ability to reproduce. You have to meet a crisis head-on. And if this is what it takes to eliminate that strain of mosquito, then that is what we're going to have to do." Nelson's comments came a day after Gov. Rick Scott announced he intends to travel to Washington next week to ask federal officials to quickly come to agreement on a plan to deal with the spread of the Zika virus. Nelson on Thursday also continued pushing for $1.9 billion in emergency funding to help deal with Zika. The funding request, which was made by President Barack Obama, remains tied up in Congress.U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., said Thursday he'd support the use of genetically modified mosquitoes in the Florida Keys to help stop the spread of the Zika virus. "I think this is going to be such a crisis that we've got to move ahead with it, certainly the pilot study," Nelson told reporters during a stop at Tallahassee International Airport. Florida has reported 102 documented cases --- the most in the nation --- of the mosquito-borne virus, which emerged last year in South Africa. The virus, while causing mild sickness, has been associated with severe birth defects. Oxitec, a British company, wants to release about 3 million genetically modified mosquitoes in the Keys as part of the first-ever trial in the U.S. of such engineering. The genetic change is intended to produce offspring that die young and can't reproduce. "It's not like taking a gene out of something and replacing it in the genetic makeup of something else," Nelson said. "This is altering a gene in the genetic makeup of the (Aedes) aegypti mosquito to turn off that mosquito's ability to reproduce. You have to meet a crisis head-on. And if this is what it takes to eliminate that strain of mosquito, then that is what we're going to have to do." Nelson's comments came a day after Gov. Rick Scott announced he intends to travel to Washington next week to ask federal officials to quickly come to agreement on a plan to deal with the spread of the Zika virus. Nelson on Thursday also continued pushing for $1.9 billion in emergency funding to help deal with Zika. The funding request, which was made by President Barack Obama, remains tied up in Congress.
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