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Plow drivers can't believe man's age after they help him shovel driveway

It had been a long day for two plow drivers in Lawrence Wednesday, but at the end of their shift they found a man attempting to shovel his driveway and decided to help

“You look over the sea of snow and it looked like it was up to his hips,” Martin Gutierrez said.

>> Read more trending news 

Gutierrez and Austin Sciacca of Dream Team Contracting had been plowing for 21 straight hours, but when they saw the man trying to shovel his 60-foot driveway by hand they stopped to lend a hand.

After finishing the driveway, the two men felt they had to ask how old he was. Maurice, the homeowner, told them his birthday was May 13, 1917.

In two months, Maurice will turn 101.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

“We come from a very close-knit family and the elders in the family are what we take care of the most because they started everything, so we definitely want to give our part back,” Sciacca said.

The contractors say they hope this act of kindness will inspire other people to do the same thing – help the elderly.

Nearly 600,000 pacifiers, teether holders recalled amid concerns about choking

The Consumer Product Safety Commission announced the recall of nearly 600,000 pacifier and teether holders because of potential choking hazards, WTHR reported.

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The CPSC said the recall of about 590,000 "Dr. Brown's Lovey pacifier & teether holders" was ordered because of a snap that could detach and choke a child.

The holders come in eight styles, WTHR reported: giraffe, zebra, turtle, reindeer, frog, spring bunny, deer and bunny. 

Consumers are asked to contact Handi-Craft, which makes the holders, at 833-224-7674 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. CDT Monday through Friday, or visit the Dr. Brown's website for more recall information, WTHR reported.

The CPSC said it has received 67 reports of the ribbon fraying and the snap coming off, but no injuries have been reported, WTHR reported.

The holders, which retail for about $10, were sold at retailers that included Bed, Bath & Beyond, KMart, Target, Toys R Us/Babies R Us and Walmart. They also were sold online at, between August 2015 and March 2018.

Utah student writes thank you notes instead of walking out of class

When her classmates participated in the national school walkout, a Utah middle school student decided to stay in class and write thank you notes.

>> Read more trending news

Elizabeth Busdicker, a ninth-grader at South Davis Jr. High School in Bountiful, told KSTU that it was not an easy decision, but she believed she made the right choice.

“Some people walked past our classroom in the halls, kind of gave me these looks, but I just felt like I was doing the right thing standing up for what I believe in,” Busdicker said. 

Busdicker said she does not agree with everything the school walkout stands for. “It's not just about stricter gun policies; it's about being kinder in our daily lives,” she told KSTU.

Busdicker said she wanted to convey some kindness in the thank you notes she wrote, believing that bullying is the core of the issue of guns.

“We wrote 17 thank you notes to 17 different people in our lives to honor their lives,”she told KSTU said.

Busdicker sent a picture to her parents showing her decision.

“Twenty six years in the United States Air Force,” said her father, Mike Busdicker. “I did that so I could protect the freedom and rights everyone in this country enjoys. That’s why I’m proud of my daughter, because she made her decision to stand up for what she believed in even though others were doing something different.”

Augie Garrido, college baseball’s winningest coach, dead at 79

Augie Garrido, the whimsical coach with the small-ball philosophy who led Texas baseball to two national championships and won more games than any other coach in college baseball history, died Thursday morning in California. He was 79.

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Garrido had been hospitalized there since suffering a stroke last weekend.

Garrido ruled the Texas dugout from 1997 until 2016, having previously coached at Cal State Fullerton, Illinois, Cal Poly and San Francisco State. He amassed an 824-427-2 record with the Longhorns, leading Texas to national titles in 2002 and 2005. He won five championships in all, having won with Cal State Fullerton in 1979, 1984 and 1995.

With a career record of 1,975-951-9, Garrido is the all-time winningest coach in Division I baseball history.

“Augie was a giant in our game,” Texas head coach David Pierce said in a statement. “His impact on baseball, on the Forty Acres, and on me and so many others will live on forever. My thoughts are with Jeannie, his friends, his family, and all those who were lucky enough to have met him, played for him, or learned from him. His presence will be sorely missed but his legacy will never be forgotten.”

Response to Garrido’s passing from former players and coaching peers poured in from around the country.

“Pressure is a choice, the world treats winners different than losers, time is the ultimate game, passion will persuade reality,” former Texas pitcher Huston Street tweeted. “Coach you’ve been a genius for so many of us. A friend, our charming second Dad we all thought was just so cool. I love you forever.”

Said longtime Rice coach Wayne Graham: “It is a sad time because I don’t think anyone did more for college baseball and baseball in general than Augie Garrido. He knew the particulars of the game better than anyone.”

Said Oklahoma coach Skip Johnson, who spent 10 years as a Garrido assistant: “I couldn’t have had a better mentor in the game. We still talked at least once a week. When I got the head coaching job here at OU, I told him I wanted to carry on his legacy with all the things he taught me.”

Said former football coach Mack Brown: “He really made you think, made you laugh and always was so much fun to be around. He was truly a special man, one of a kind.”

Garrido set the career wins record in 2003 when Texas toppled top-ranked Florida State for his 1,428th win. Eleven years later, he broke the record for all collegiate coaches in a 5-1 win over Texas State. Florida State’s Mike Martin, who has coached the Seminoles since 1980, could break Garrido’s career record this season.

“College baseball and the world lost one of the finest men in our coaching profession,” Martin said in a statement. “Augie dedicated his life to making young men better people. He will be deeply missed by myself and many others.”

Texas basketball coach Shaka Smart, in Nashville for the Longhorns’ first-round game Friday against Nevada in the NCAA Tournament, called Garrido a mentor and said he was heartbroken.

“I don’t know what to say. I loved Augie,” Smart said. “He taught me so much in the time we were together. He taught me so much about the fact that what we were doing in our case is so much bigger than basketball, and in his case was so much bigger than baseball.”

While at Texas, Garrido coached 27 All-Americans and 102 players who went on to play professionally. Each of the 11 Longhorns that were selected in last year’s MLB draft were recruited by Garrido. In 2016, he told the Statesman that Street was the best Longhorn he had ever coached.

“What might seem exceptional for one person was very normal for him, to be able to perform and be successful in different environments,” Garrido said of Street, who has 324 saves in 13 MLB seasons. “His fearless approach to throwing to the mitt and trusting his teammates to do the rest — he came here with that.”

Texas won 18 of its last 20 games in 2002, with the final one being a 12-6 win over South Carolina to win the national championship at the College World Series. Led by pitchers Justin Simmons and Street as well as Tim Moss’ and Dustin Majewski’s All-American bats, the Longhorns went 57-15 and secured the school’s first baseball title since 1983.

Three years later, Garrido led UT back to the winner’s circle. Following a runner-up finish in 2004, Texas closed out its 2005 campaign with seven straight wins. The Longhorns (56-16) beat Florida 6-2 for the crown.

Texas relieved Garrido of his duties following the 2016 season. The Longhorns had reached the College World Series in 2014, but the program posted losing records in conference play the next two years. Texas went 25-32 in 2016; Garrido’s final game was an 8-2 loss to TCU at the Big 12 tournament.

Following his departure, Garrido had served as a special assistant to the athletic director. But he was occasionally still seen at Texas games. Last month, he and legendary LSU coach Skip Bertman threw out the ceremonial first pitches ahead of the two schools’ first meeting since the Tigers beat the Longhorns for the 2009 NCAA title.

“This is a very, very sad day,” UT athletic director Chris Del Conte said in a statement. “We lost one of the greatest coaches of all time, a truly special Longhorn Legend and college athletics icon. There will never be another Augie Garrido. He was a once-in-a-lifetime personality whose impact on Texas Athletics, collegiate baseball and the student-athletes he coached extended far beyond the playing field.”

He was born August Edmun Garrido, Jr. on Feb. 6, 1939, in Vallejo, Calif. Garrido’s first appearance in the College World Series was as a Fresno State outfielder in 1959. After three years with the Bulldogs, he spent six years in the Cleveland Indians’ farm system.

In 1966, Garrido landed his first coaching job at Sierra High School in Tollhouse, Calif. Three years later, his college coaching career began when he took over the program at San Francisco State University.

Garrido is survived by his wife, Jeannie, and daughter, Lisa.

Baltimore woman pays $19,000 for cat's kidney transplant 

One tabby ran up quite a hospital tab, but the feline’s owner said she had no regrets.

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In late November, Betsy Boyd spent $19,000 -- 41 percent of her annual salary -- on a kidney transplant for her 17-year-old cat, Stanley, the Baltimore Sun reported. 

As a condition for the surgery, Boyd also adopted the kidney donor, a 2-year-old tabby named Jay, the Sun reported. Now Boyd has six cats in her household, but saving Stanley was her biggest goal.

“Anything could happen. If Stan did pass away sooner rather than later, I’d know I had done what I could for him,” Boyd told the Sun. “We’ve already had a few really good weeks. He’s really happy, and that alone is worth the price.”

Boyd, 44, is a part-time member of the University of Baltimore’s creative writing faculty and earns $46,000 annually, the Sun reported. Her husband, Michael Yockel, is a freelance journalist and stay-at-home dad who cares for the couple’s 3-year-old twin sons.

“I’m smart with money,” Boyd told the Sun. “I’m very frugal. I drive a used car and wear clothing from consignment stores, and I have no debt at all. The message I’d like to get across is that if you save your money carefully, you can spend $19,000 on something that moves you.”

And there is no question that Stanley is important to Boyd.

“Stanley is the only human cat,” she said. “I love all my cats, but Stanley is the only one who acts like a human being trapped in a cat’s body. He’s so vocal and communicative. He maintains eye contact better than any cat I’ve ever known. When I’m at work, he waits at the window or front door for me to come home, just like a dog.”

Boyd realizes the cat’s life can be fragile, but the odds of long-term survival improved dramatically after six months. So Boyd is eagerly awaiting that milestone, which occurs on May 28.

“Knowing Stanley as I do,” she told the Sun, “I think he’s one of those cats who could make it to age 25.”

Philly mom upset when 6-year-old daughter allegedly put on wrong bus

The mother of a 6-year-old Philadelphia student is furious after the child was put on the wrong school bus and allegedly stranded Tuesday afternoon, WPVI reported. 

>> Read more trending news

Laianna Correa, who attends the West Oak Lane Charter School, said she was told to exit the bus when it completed its route.

“I said, ‘This is not my stop,’ and she said she ‘didn't care,’" Laianna said.

Danielle Correa said she was “livid.” 

“I'm outraged because you pick a school thinking that your child is going to be taken care of during the day,” she told WPVI.

Laianna was dropped off more than two miles from her regular bus stop, Correa said. She was able to find her way home because she knew a classmate on the bus, and that child’s parents contacted Correa.

A spokesman for Durham School Services, the company that operates the buses, originally apologized and said it was launching an investigation, WPVI reported. Later, Durham Services said its investigation showed that Laianna was not forced off the bus. The company said the child told the driver she was going to a sleepover with a friend, WPVI reported.

Correa said she never gave permission for her child to go on another bus.

“She could've wound up anywhere,” Correa told WPVI said. “Unacceptable. It will not happen again.”

The principal of West Oak Lane Charter School said the school is now making changes to its afternoon dismissal policies, WPVI reported.

Costco hosting 'Military Hour' on March 24

Members of the military and veterans will be able to get a head start Saturday, March 24, at more than 100 Costco stores nationwide. The membership-only warehouse club will be hosting a “Military Hour” that includes a private early opening, food samples and freebies, the company said in a news release.

>> Read more trending news

Stores at 117 locations will open at 8 a.m. local time for military members and their families. The first 100 visitors at each location will receive a goodies bag, the company said in the release.

Persons attending do not have to be Costco members, but only members will be allowed to make purchases. Costco is offering an exclusive membership for military members who join for the first time, the company said.

'Willie Wonka' actor appears on 'Jeopardy!'

Mike Teevee won another Golden Ticket, but you had to be a big chocolate fan to recognize him.

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Paris Themmen, who played the TV-obsessed kid in the 1971 movie “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory,” finally made it to television on Tuesday when he appeared in an episode of “Jeopardy!” ET Online reported.

However, Themmen did not mention that he had been in the classic that starred Gene Wilder. When host Alex Trebek asked Themmen about an interesting fact, the former child star said he was an “avid backpacker” who had hiked on six continents, ET Online reported.

Themmen’s fans recognized him, however, and mentioned that fact on Twitter. He wound up finishing second during Tuesday’s episode, ET Online reported. The last acting role Themmen had was a small part in the 2000 television series, “Star Trek: Voyager.”

Jurors watch graphic footage recorded at Pulse nightclub in Florida

Testimony continued Thursday in the trial of Noor Salman, the widow of a man who fatally shot 49 people and injured dozens more in a June 2016 attack at a Florida nightclub.

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The case hinges on whether Salman, 31, knowingly helped her husband, Omar Mateen, plan the attack at Pulse nightclub in Orlando. She has pleaded not guilty to charges of aiding the support of a foreign terrorist organization resulting in death and obstruction of justice. She faces life in prison if convicted.

Jurors on Thursday watched a video timeline of the massacre, which included graphic footage recorded by the nightclub's surveillance cameras.

Jurors were also shown graphic footage captured by police body-worn cameras.

The videos shows Mateen shooting people in the nightclub's main area. Some ran, some fell. He was seen walking from room to room and shooting more people before heading back to the main area and firing more shots.

Salman turned her head away and wept while the videos were played.

"I feel like he is the devil in a human being's body," Susan Adeih, Salman's cousin, said outside the courthouse. "I feel so bad for the families. For Omar, I don't really give a damn. I wish Omar would burn in hell. That's how I feel."

Prosecutors showed jurors photographs of the nightclub's restroom, which flooded after police damaged water pipes while breaching a wall. Evidence was submerged in several inches of bloody water.

Although the photos and video are hard to forget, WFTV legal analyst Bill Sheaffer said that showing them to jurors so early in the case could give defense attorneys a slight advantage.

"You have days and weeks for the shock effect to wear off," he said. "And then the jury concentrates on the facts, not on the emotionalism of the video."

Prosecutors on Thursday called to the stand Fort Pierce police Lt. William Hall, who was sent to Mateen's apartment to check for bombs and booby traps.

When Hall arrived, Salman exited the apartment with her 3-year-old son.

Salman at first refused to allow investigators to search her apartment and her car, but she changed her mind while they were trying to obtain a search warrant.

Hall said he made a tactical mistake by allowing Salman to go to her bedroom alone to change clothes. When he brought up Orlando, before mentioning the attack, Salman asked if they were going to take her to Walt Disney World -- something that wasn't included in his report.

Hall didn't ask Salman if she knew where her husband was or if he was alone, which was information that could have saved lives, he said.

FBI Special Agent Chris Mayo, who interviewed Salman in a police car, testified that he took her to an FBI field office and sat her in a large conference room so she and her son would be more comfortable.

Mayo said it was a fluid situation, but defense attorneys will argue that agents didn't initially perceive her as a threat.

Salman never asked what happened to her husband, he said.

Mayo said he didn't record the interview because it wasn't an interrogation, but in hindsight, he probably should have.

Testimony is scheduled to resume Monday.

'Gonzaga Grandma' celebration goes viral

March Madness has only just begun, and already there is an internet sensation: the Gonzaga Grandma.

>> Read more trending news

Fourth-seeded Gonzaga squeaked past UNC-Greensboro 68-64 Thursday afternoon and did not clinch the victory until freshman guard Zach Norvell Jr. hit a 3-point shot with 20.8 seconds remaining to snap a 64-64 tie.

After the basket, the TNT cameras caught an elderly woman in the Gonzaga cheering section celebrating by pointing her arms to the sky, mouthing the words “Thank you, Father.”

It was a heavenly way for the Bulldogs to avoid an upset. The Gonzaga Grandma’s reaction quickly went viral:

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