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McConaughey fears March for Our Lives will get 'hijacked'

A month after speaking at the March for Our Lives in his hometown of Austin, Texas, Matthew McConaughey says he supports some gun control but fears the youth-led movement could be "hijacked" by those hoping to eliminate all guns in the United States.

McConaughey spoke about his support for the marchers on Monday in Las Vegas, where he was promoting his upcoming film, "White Boy Rick," at the CinemaCon theater-owners convention.

He called gun violence "an epidemic in our country."

"I've got a lot of friends who are gun owners. I've got a lot of friends who are NRA (National Rifle Association). I grew up hunting. We had responsible gun ownership, but I was taught the right way to respect that tool," he said. "At the same time, their petition that they were speaking about is a very good one. And I also fear that their campaign — they have to watch that they don't get hijacked. Meaning, a lot of the crowd was for no guns at all. That was not the march for life. March for Our Lives was for rightful, just, responsible gun ownership — but against assault rifles, against unlimited magazines and for following up on the regulations."

The 48-year-old Oscar winner said he hoped to find room for agreement between anti-gun activists and the NRA.

"The two sides (have) got to talk. Because we both agree that there's an epidemic. We both agree something has got to change. So I was for what they were marching for, and I wanted to speak to my hometown on the capital of my state Texas' steps. And also talk to the many men and women who I grew up with, I know that had the guns, that owned the guns, and say hey, do we really, where can we reach across the aisle here? Find a compromise for the betterment of all of us?"

McConaughey plays the father of a teenager who becomes a drug dealer and an FBI informant in "White Boy Rick," based on a true story. It's set for a September release in theaters.

Ibrahim Nasrallah wins Arabic book prize for dystopian novel

Jordanian-Palestinian writer Ibrahim Nasrallah has won the International Prize for Arabic Fiction with a novel about humanity's capacity for savagery.

"The Second War of the Dog" was named winner at a ceremony Tuesday in the Emirates capital, Abu Dhabi.

Set in a dystopian future society, the book centers on an opponent of the regime who descends into brutal nihilism. The author has called it "a warning of what we could become in the future."

Ibrahim Al Saafin, who chaired the judging panel, said the book used "humor and insight" to expose society's tendency toward brutality.

Nasrallah's book was chosen from among 124 entries from 14 countries for the award, which is affiliated with Britain's prestigious Man Booker Prize.

He wins $50,000 and funding for an English translation of his novel.

Masseuse accuses Marvel's Stan Lee of fondling himself

A Chicago masseuse is suing Marvel Comic's Stan Lee, accusing him of inappropriate behavior during two massages in 2017.

Maria Carballo filed the lawsuit Monday seeking more than $50,000 in punitive damages and attorney fees from the 95-year-old writer and artist.

The Chicago Tribune reports that Lee's attorney, Jonathan Freund, called the lawsuit "a shakedown" and says Lee denies the allegations.

Carballo also filed a complaint with Chicago police, who are investigating.

According to the complaint, Lee fondled himself during the first massage and moaned so much during the second that Carballo stopped the treatment. Lee stood up and angrily demanded Carballo keep massaging him.

The complaint also says Carballo was massaging Lee with her feet when he grabbed her foot and touched it to his genitals.

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Information from: Chicago Tribune, http://www.chicagotribune.com

Foy: 'Crown' pay gap issue 'definitely opened my eyes'

Claire Foy says the controversy over her pay for the Netflix series "The Crown" has changed her approach to Hollywood.

"It definitely opened my eyes to a lot. And I certainly won't be naïve about those things," Foy said in an interview on Monday in Las Vegas. "It's really opened my eyes about what I am allowed to have an opinion about, and what I'm allowed to stand up for myself about. And I think that's really changed my approach to myself and other women in this industry. It's been only a positive thing — even though, embarrassing."

A producer disclosed last month that Foy, who starred as Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, was paid less than Matt Smith, who played Prince Philip, because Smith was better known.

The gender pay gap has become a big issue in Hollywood after revelations that many female stars have been paid less than their male counterparts. Foy and Smith are being replaced by older performers in the next season of the show.

Foy was in Las Vegas promoting "The Girl in the Spider's Web," which completed filming this month. It's based on the fourth book in the popular Millennium series revolving around hacker Lisbeth Salander, previously been played in movies by Noomi Rapace and Rooney Mara. Swedish Author Stieg Larsson, who died in 2004, created the series, and and the fourth installment was written by David Lagercrantz.

Foy said she hadn't sought their blessing before beginning her work.

"I mean, we are all actresses. We all know the game. I don't doubt for a second that those two incredible actresses don't both hate me and also ... "

Director Fede Alvarez interjected that he did indeed get Rapace's blessing.

"I met her at the premiere of her last movie and we got introduced and I told her what I was doing and she really wished us good luck and she knew you were doing it," he said.

"You got her blessing? Did you? He never told me this," Foy said, laughing. "Oh, well there you go. One down! One to go."

The 34-year-old actress says she exercised intensively to play the character — and got a new hair style.

"I got an undercut, which is something that I never thought I would have in my life. Which is great! Then all her tattoos and just how she moves and the clothes that she wears. I loved being her every day, actually. It was very liberating thing," Foy said. "Because I didn't have to worry about being attractive or being liked or any of that nonsense that women quite often have to wake up every day thinking how does the world see me? And it was really nice to wake up and just be like, like this. What you see is what you get. I quite enjoyed that."

"The Girl in the Spider's Web" is set for release in November.

Prince Harry, Meghan Markle select gospel group for wedding

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are striking a different note with the music for their upcoming wedding, mixing gospel with choral works as the soundtrack for what they pledge will be a joyful occasion.

Kensington Palace said Tuesday that Harry and his American fiancee "have taken a great deal of interest and care" in selecting the wedding music. The palace says there will be performances by the St George's Chapel choir and Karen Gibson and The Kingdom Choir, a gospel group from southeast England.

The performers include 19-year-old cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason, who says he was "bowled over" when Markle called to ask him to play during the ceremony.

The couple has revealed details of their May 19 upcoming wedding over several weeks, with more to come.

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For complete royal wedding coverage, visit https://apnews.com/tag/Royalweddings

Comey book sells more than 600,000 copies in first week

James Comey's "A Higher Loyalty" had a very big opening week.

Flatiron Books announced Tuesday that sales topped 600,000 copies, a number that includes print, audio and e-books. The former FBI director's memoir has been one of the year's most anticipated releases and includes his accounts of investigating Hillary Clinton's emails and of his awkward encounters with President Donald Trump.

Reviews have been mostly favorable, with The New York Times calling the book "impassioned" and "absorbing." And Trump, who has showed a knack for helping publications he despises, tweeted that Comey was an "untruthful slime ball." Comey, fired by Trump a year ago, has likened the president to a crime boss who values personal loyalty over service to the country.

Published April 17, "A Higher Loyalty" is the hottest political book since Michael Wolff's million-selling "Fire and Fury," which came out in January. Its first week sales, which include pre-orders, well exceed those of "Fire and Fury." But the two books, both published by imprints of Macmillan, had very different launches.

"A Higher Loyalty" has been talked about for months and had an announced pre-release print run of 850,000 copies. The demand for "Fire and Fury" seemed to catch many people, including Trump, by surprise. The announced print run by Henry Holt and Co. was just 150,000 copies and many stores went out of stock during the book's initial time on sale. Thanks to unusually large e-book sales for a nonfiction release and a rush to get hardcover copies back onto shelves, "Fire and Fury" had sold more than 500,000 copies within two weeks and well over 1 million copies after three weeks.

The fastest-selling nonfiction books in recent memory include Bill Clinton's "My Life" and Sarah Palin's "Going Rogue," both of which were million sellers after two weeks of publication. Among fiction releases, J.K. Rowling's "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows" sold more than 8 million copies in its first 24 hours.

Bob Dorough of 'Schoolhouse Rock' is dead at 94

A musician whose songs helped teach children on ABC's "Schoolhouse Rock" has died.

His son, Chris, says 94-year-old Bob Dorough died of natural causes Monday at his home in Mount Bethel, Pennsylvania.

According to his biography, the jazz musician "set the multiplication tables to music" as musical director for the educational cartoon series between 1973 and 1985. It was revived from 1993 to 1999.

He also wrote the song "Devil May Care," which jazz great Miles Davis recorded as an instrumental version.

Dorough was born in Arkansas and raised in Texas. He headed to New York City after graduating from the University of North Texas in 1949. He eventually settled in Pennsylvania.

A funeral is tentatively scheduled for Monday in Mount Bethel.

The Latest: Cosby jury to begin deliberating Wednesday

The Latest on Bill Cosby's sexual assault retrial (all times local):

6:10 p.m.

The jury in Bill Cosby's sexual assault retrial is expected to begin deliberating the comedian's fate on Wednesday.

Judge Steven O'Neill says jurors indicated they were exhausted after listening to more than five hours of closing arguments on Tuesday.

Cosby is charged with drugging and molesting a woman at his suburban Philadelphia home in 2004. The 80-year-old comedian says his encounter with Andrea Constand was consensual.

His lawyers told the panel of seven men and five women Tuesday that Constand made up the assault allegation as part of a scheme to file suit and extract millions of dollars from Cosby.

Prosecutor Stewart Ryan urged jurors to "look that man in the eye and tell him the truth about what he did."

The Associated Press doesn't typically identify people who say they're victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission. Constand has done so.

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5:30 p.m.

A prosecutor is attacking Bill Cosby's star defense witness.

Prosecutor Stewart Ryan said in his closing argument Tuesday that Marguerite Jackson's testimony was "fictional."

Jackson is a Temple University academic adviser who testified that Cosby's chief accuser, Andrea Constand, once spoke of falsely accusing a high-profile person of sexual assault so she could file a lawsuit.

Ryan called it a "fictional conversation."

He also rejected the defense explanation that Cosby paid nearly $3.4 million to settle Constand's civil lawsuit in 2006 because it was a nuisance and he feared bad publicity.

Cosby is charged with drugging and assaulting Constand at his home outside Philadelphia. He says their sexual encounter was consensual. His lawyers say Constand framed him so she could file suit.

The Associated Press doesn't typically identify people who say they're victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission. Constand has done so.

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3:30 p.m.

A prosecutor at Bill Cosby's sexual assault retrial says he used his good-guy image as America's Dad to gain unsuspecting women's trust before knocking them out with powerful drugs and violating them.

Prosecutor Kristen Feden delivered closing arguments Tuesday, saying Cosby is "nothing like the image that he played on TV."

She says Cosby led a secret life that ran counter to the wholesome image he projected as Dr. Cliff Huxtable on his top-rated 1980s sitcom.

Cosby is charged with drugging and sexually assaulting a woman at his suburban Philadelphia home in 2004. He says the encounter was consensual. His lawyers have called his chief accuser a con artist who falsely accused Cosby in hopes of a big payday.

Feden says Cosby is the true con artist.

The jury is expected to begin deliberating later Tuesday.

The Associated Press doesn't typically identify people who say they're victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission. Constand has done so.

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12:10 p.m.

Bill Cosby's lawyers are urging a jury to acquit the 80-year-old comedian of sexual assault charges they say are based on "flimsy, silly, ridiculous evidence."

The defense at Cosby's retrial gave its closing argument Tuesday. His lawyers slammed chief accuser Andrea Constand as a "pathological liar." They highlighted more than a dozen inconsistencies in what Constand has said over the years about her relationship with Cosby and her allegations that he drugged and molested her at his suburban Philadelphia home.

Cosby's wife of 54 years was in the courtroom for his lawyers' arguments.

Prosecutors will deliver their closing argument next. The jury is expected to get the case later Tuesday.

Cosby says his encounter with Constand was consensual. A jury deadlocked on the charges last year, setting the stage for a retrial.

The Associated Press doesn't typically identify people who say they're victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission. Constand has done so.

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9:50 a.m.

Bill Cosby's spokesman says the comedian's wife will be in the courtroom for the defense closing argument.

Cosby arrived for the 12th day of his sexual assault retrial Tuesday morning accompanied for the first time by Camille, his wife of 54 years.

Cosby spokesman Andrew Wyatt says he didn't want Camille and other family members there for the rest of the trial.

Wyatt says she's in court to support defense lawyers Tom Mesereau and Kathleen Bliss as they deliver their closing argument, just as she was there to support her husband's lawyer during closing arguments at last year's trial. That jury deadlocked on the charges.

Cosby is charged with drugging and molesting a woman in 2004. He says it was consensual.

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8:45 a.m.

Bill Cosby has arrived for the 12th day of his sexual assault retrial, accompanied for the first time by his wife of 54 years.

The 80-year-old and his wife, Camille, didn't talk to reporters as they entered the suburban Philadelphia courthouse, where closing arguments and deliberations are expected Tuesday.

The comedian is charged with three counts of aggravated indecent assault.

The charges stem from Andrea Constand's allegations that he drugged and molested her at his suburban Philadelphia mansion in January 2004.

Cosby's lawyers devoted part of their case to travel records they say prove he couldn't have been there when she says the alleged assault happened.

They argue that any encounter there with Constand would have happened earlier, outside the statute of limitations.

The Associated Press doesn't typically identify people who say they're victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done.

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12:10 a.m.

Bill Cosby's sexual assault retrial will soon be in the hands of a jury.

Closing arguments and deliberations are set for Tuesday. The defense rested Monday after Cosby said he wouldn't testify.

The comedian is charged with three counts of aggravated indecent assault.

The charges stem from Andrea Constand's allegations that he drugged and molested her at his suburban Philadelphia mansion in January 2004.

Cosby's lawyers devoted part of their case to travel records they say prove he couldn't have been there when she says the alleged assault happened.

They argue that any encounter there with Constand would have happened earlier, outside the statute of limitations.

The Associated Press doesn't typically identify people who say they're victims of sexual assault unless they grant permission, which Constand has done.

Royal baby: Prince Charles welcomes new grandson

Prince Charles said Tuesday it is a "great joy" to be a grandfather once again with the birth of a third child for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

The duchess gave birth to the 8-pound, 7-ounce (3.8 kilogram) boy Monday morning at St. Mary's Hospital in London. The new prince is a younger brother to 4-year-old Prince George and Princess Charlotte, who turns 3 next week.

Charles said in a statement that "it is a great joy to have another grandchild, the only trouble is I don't know how I am going to keep up with them."

As the new family of five spent time at home at Kensington Palace, the birth was marked Tuesday by bell ringing at Westminster Abbey and gun salutes in Hyde Park and at the Tower of London.

The new baby is a sixth great-grandchild for Queen Elizabeth II and is fifth in line to the throne after Charles, father Prince William and his two older siblings.

William and Kate have not yet disclosed the name of the infant prince. Bookmakers say Arthur is the favorite in betting, followed by James and Albert.

Kym Johnson and Robert Herjavec welcome twins

Kym Johnson and Robert Herjavec have something to dance about.

The former "Dancing with the Stars" partners have welcomed twins into the world.

Johnson posted on Instagram that their "little angels" were born on Monday morning. The 41-year-old says she never thought her heart could feel so full.

The couple had previously announced they were expecting a boy and a girl. They did not reveal their names.

Herjavec is the father of three children from a previous marriage. The 55-year-old businessman appears on "Shark Tank."

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